The History of Walton, Kentucky

Walton: The Beginning, Mid-1790

    On April 1, 1785 Levi Todd and his heirs were granted 598 acres in northern Fayette County (now Boone County), Kentucky. On December 1, 1801 Levi and Jane Todd of Fayette County sold 300 acres on the "main road from George Town to Cincinnati" to Archibald and Lucy Reid. Archibald Reid was licensed to run a tavern in "his house"  as recorded by  Boone County about 1803, just north of what is now the City of Walton. He is credited with founding the county’s first distillery five years later as well as becoming one of Boone County’s first justices in 1799.

    On February 22, 1806, the Reids' sold 200 acres of the land for $1,500 to Caleb Summers. On that same day or next, Summers took out two mortgages with Thomas Kennady. Payment on these mortgages included both money and 'merchantable whiskey'. Summers was apparently a distiller of commercial whiskey. It is possible that he had taken over Reid's distillery mentioned above.

     By the summer of 1808, Summers had defaulted on his mortgages and Reid took him to court. The 200 acres was sold at auction on June 27, 1808 when Thomas Kennady (the mortgage holder) bought the property for $414.12 (Deed Book B, p 153)

     On January 1, 1809 Summers sold Abner Gaines 192 acres for the greatly increased price of $1,666.66 (Deed Book C,p 149). However, this deed was not filed until December 22, 1813. This is probably due to the fact that Gaines bought the same 200 acres on November 24, 1813  from Thomas Kennady and his wife Dinah for $1,810 (Deed Book C, p 148). Gaines then sold 11 acres of the 200 back to Summers; the location of this property is not known. Gaines continued to acquire a tavern license at his house through December 1818.

     In 1818, an ad in the Western Monitor, a Lexington newspaper, advertises the  Gaines Stagecoach Line carrying mail and passengers between Cincinnati and Lexington: a 34-hour trip over the Covington-Lexington Turnpike.   It is supposed the house continued to be a tavern and inn for the stagecoach line until the death of Abner Gaines in 1839. In the book "Western Life in the Stirrups", the diary of Virtulon Rich in 1832, states "At 5 o'clock PM of the 8th of June I packed off my horse again & crossed the Ohio River into Covington Ky upon the south bank. This is a small Town, having a Cotton factory & Iron works in it-It is separated from another small Town called Newport containing a population of 500, by a small River called Licking. During this pm I rode 18 miles to a very good public House-large & splendid - plenty of Slaves attached to the premises".  (Geographically, it is believed this is the Gaines Tavern since he traveled on to Georgetown).

     The settlement that grew up around the tavern came to be called Gaines’ Fork Roads. The first recorded post office for Gaines’ Fork Roads (later called Gaines’ Cross Roads) was established on July 4, 1815. Our fourth United States President, James Madison, appointed James Matthews Gaines, Abner Gaines oldest son, Postmaster. 

    Col. Abner Gaines, as he was later called, served as a Boone County Justice from 1805 to 1817, at which time he was appointed sheriff. (This appointment is probably why he no longer acquired his tavern license).  John Pendleton Gaines, son of Col. Gaines, served in Congress in the 1840’s and was governor of the Oregon Territory from 1850 to 1853. 

   On January 21, 1840, the town that grew just south of Gaines Cross Roads was named Walton by an act of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The boundary included the town lots belonging to the following persons: E. Brasher, William Pitcher, John Arnold, Reuben Noel, Michael Snyder, William Vanhorn, Margaret Leonard, Silas Bridges, Elizabeth Butts, Nathan Connelly, Samuel McLean, Melville Rich and W. W. Gaines.

    In 1847, records show that Walton had 538 residents. That was 35 more residents than Petersburg and almost 100 more than Florence.

    In the early 1800’s, during the town’s infancy, there was a county public grade school in the corner of Beaver Grade (Old Beaver Road) and Stephenson Mill Road (Old Stephenson Mill Road). A Mrs. Clara Myers started the first school to offer high school subjects.

1850's - 1890's

    During this time, Walton was a small town of about 500 residents. Tobacco factories, livery stables and carriage builders were the businesses in town. In the years following the Civil War the town became the railroad center of Boone County. The railroad prompted rapid growth for the City. In the late 1860’s, the Kentucky Central Railroad, later acquired by the Louisville & Nashville (L&N), laid tracks through Walton and Verona, our neighbor to the west. In the mid-1870’s the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific, later part of the Southern rail system, was built through Walton and Richwood. Walton became the most important shipping point in Boone County for farm produce, as well as a local drop-off point for mail-order items. Following the turn of the 20th century, passenger service was introduced, and daily commuter trains linked Walton with Cincinnati, Covington, and Ludlow. As late as the 1920’s Walton residents commuted to work or to school by train.

    Walton developed as a railroad town, bound by rail lines on the east and west. A business district between the tracks flourished along Main Street, and residential neighborhoods developed to the north and south. A small industrial and warehouse district grew up beside the L & N tracks, and worker housing was built near the Southern depot. The early streets of Walton were Locust Street, Church Street, Beaver Road, High Street, and the Covington & Lexington Turnpike (Main Street) according to the Walton map of 1883.        

    In the years following the Civil War a small African American Community formed in north Walton. Several Generations of the Steele and Ingram families, descendants of freed slaves, made their homes in the modest hall-parlor and saddlebag dwellings along Church Street. The center of the community was the Zion Baptist Church, founded on 1872. 

    Also during these early years the Churches of Walton were established. The earliest being First Baptist Church, Walton was established on August 8, 1866, followed by Zion Baptist in 1872, Walton Christian Church in 1876, Walton Methodist in 1879, and All Saints in 1894.

    In 1880 Walton had the first known organized firefighters. They were known as the “Bucket Brigade”. There were 12 cistern built along the roadside to be used only for fighting fires. These cisterns were used until 1936 when the City installed a water system.

    In 1883 a Mr. Henry Newton was a teacher of the “select school offering all branches of mathematics and a regular course of thorough instruction”. In 1902 this private school located on South Main Street became a public school.  

    The Walton Deposit Bank was established in 1890 with a capital stock of $25,000, which increased later to $50,000, all paid up. Dr. D.M. Bagby was President, O. Percival was Vice President, R.C. Greene was the Cashier. The building was a very commanding structure commodiously arranged for the special use assigned. Dr. Bagby was an ex-Confederate soldier, popular and public-spirited. He was also a director in the Walton Perpetual Building and Loan Association. He succeeded Dr. B.D. Allen as President of the bank. The Vice President, Mr. Percival, was a very prosperous and influential citizen and business man. R.C. Green was born in Grant Co., and reared in Kenton, and had filled the office of Cashier since the inception of bank, being previous agent for C. & S.R.R. at Brock, KY. He married Miss Eleanor Southgate; they had one daughter. Mr. C.C. Metcalf was the Assistant Cashier and succeeded Mr. C.E. Ford, who went with the Fifth National Bank in Cincinnati. Mr. W.L. Rouse was a very worthy young man and was retained as Clerk and Bookkeeper.

   William H. Metcalf served as Postmaster by appointment from November 1897 through 1901.

   In 1894 the names of the streets in Walton were Main, High Street, Columbia, Scott, Cruse, Locust, Botts, Verona, Arnold and Banklick Street.

   In the late 1800's-1900's the town marshal of Walton was paid $6.50 per month and $1.00 for each dog he killed and buried.

   In 1897 an ordinance was passed prohibiting trains from running more than 15 mph though Walton.

   In 1898 Walton had only 2 paid fireman. The first fire chief, Taylor Stilley and his assistant chief Eugene DeMoisey. These two men were paid $2.00 for every fire they went to.

    In 1899 the Walton Lodge F & A.M. was organized.

   The Percival Southgate House, standing at 189 North Main Street, is believed to have been built for a Canadian named Percival Southgate during the Civil War era around 1860. The J. G. Tomlin House, standing at 109 North Main Street, was built around 1885. Behind the house is a former summer kitchen or smokehouse. J. G. Tomlin was a lawyer and the proprietor of a tobacco re-handling house in Walton.

1900 - 1920’s

    During this time Walton is the largest town in Boone County, with the county’s largest business district and diverse manufacturing enterprises. In 1900 the local school district merged with Verona, forming one of the county’s first consolidated districts. The Walton Graded School opened in 1901 at 85 North Main Street (now converted into apartments). The building included 12 grades under one roof. Classrooms for the first eight grades were on the first floor, and a high school and a chapel occupied the second. In 1902 the Walton Independent School District was created. It was the first public secondary school in Boone County. Students from outlying areas boarded with town families during the week, returning home on the weekends. In the early 20’s basketball games were held in a tobacco warehouse on Depot Street. Walton High School graduated five students in 1926. Graduation ceremonies alternated every year between the Baptist and Christian Church.

    According to the recorded minutes of the Walton Board of Trustees meeting June 4, 1902 the following were present: J. T. Booth, chairman, G. W. Ransler, Cyrus Coffman, J. M. Stamler, and J. L. Adams, and W. L. Rouse, Clerk. During this meeting the following motion was recorded: “Mr. Alford Stephens take charge of the fire engine for one year for $15.00 and $1.00 for each time he takes it out for fire provided if said Stephens does not keep said engine clean, and primed and in working order at all times he is not to have any compensation whatever. The money is to be paid at the end of the year”.  A. R. Hance was the town Marshall and tax collector and John G. Tomlin was the city’s attorney.

   Following are excerpts of a description of Walton that was printed in the first edition Walton Advertiser, the local newspaper, in August of 1914. The Advertiser was founded by G. B. Powers and Roy D. Stamler and was “published as often as necessary”.

   Walton is not a sleepy little village hid away among the hills, with nothing to boast of but beautiful scenery, but it is a ‘regular’ town, with a miniature Broadway, electric lights, with houses showing the best of attractions in living and silent drama, a beautiful pike “The Highway to Lexington”, crosses within the city limits, two railroads, The Louisville & Nashville and the Queen and Crescent accommodating the traveling public with eleven trains daily. The accommodations of these roads are so good, and the rates so low, that we are but a step from Cincinnati, Ohio, nineteen miles away. Many men work in Ludlow, Covington and Cincinnati, leave in the morning and return in the evening securing the mileage for the month for the small sum of $5.00.

   Two prosperous banks and a building and loan association lend a helping hand to those desiring financial assistance, at a very low rate. Two lumber companies of no small proportion are kept busy supplying our local contractors. Twelve mercantile establishments in the town do a prosperous business and there is room for more. Our Marshall, Police Court and jail are luxuries. In the past thirteen years only one white man has been incarcerated, and then only for a misdemeanor.

    The town is local option in its fullest meaning, intoxicated men are so seldom seen they appear as curiosities to the younger generation. The day of the “blind tiger” has long ago passed away and the drunkard of a few years ago is the homebuilder of today. Our standard of culture is far beyond any town of equal population.

    Our excellent schools, churches, library and Lyceum Courses are the direct causes of Walton’s high standing on the list of progressive Kentucky towns.

    In 1900, C. Scott Chambers and his wife, Alta, left Petersburg, Kentucky, to move to Walton the largest city in the county. He was an ambitious young “undertaker” and father of three daughters, Mary Scott, Aleen, and Ella Mae. His daughter Mary Scott, was very interested in the funeral business. She conducted her first service, a graveside service, at the Richwood Presbyterian Church at the age of 13. She graduated from high school at 16 and went to Cincinnati College of Embalming daily by train, but had to wait until she was 21 to receive her license. She was the first lady embalmer in the state of Kentucky. Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, the city’s oldest business, is still in operation today at the corner of North Main Street and Alta Vista Drive and is operated by the fourth generation.

    In October 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed John Grant Tomlin, a lawyer and tobacco proprietor, Postmaster. He served until July 12, 1905 when Samuel Lycurcus Edwards was appointed to his third term as Postmaster. Mr. S. L. Edwards, the son of Dr. R. A. Edwards who came to Walton from Scotland before the Civil War, also had a hardware store that housed the post office and a building and loan association. Lycurcus also served as an undertaker, although he didn’t have a funeral home. He had the first elevator and the first telephone in Walton.  This building is the current A. Q. W. building at 18 North Main Street.

    An engineer named Dan J. O'Conor had an idea that was pretty straightforward: take fabric, coat it with resin while it winds on a spindle into the shape of a tube, split the tube lenghtwise, unroll it, press it flat and then cure it. The result was a laminated plastic material that was tough, light, and an excellent electrical insulator. It was easy to see the commercial potential of this new material. O'Conor was just 31 years old, and he worked for Westinghouse in Pittsburgh as head of the process section of the research engineering department. One of O'Conor's friends at Westinghouse was Herbert A. Faber, 30, the manager of insulating-material sales. Faber's engineering training at the University of Cincinnati gave him a technical appreciation of O'Conor's new insulating material. O'Conor filed for a patent in February of 1913 and within weeks, O'Conor and Faber quit Westinghouse to start their own insulator business. O'Conor sought investors. They found what they needed in Walton KY., where a lawyer-banker named John G. Tomlin agreed to put up $7,500. He became a silent partner. O'Conor and Faber ran they business and named it Formica.

    In 1926 the franchise for the sale of Chevrolet cars in Boone and Gallatin Counties was taken over by John L. Vest of Walton, with whom is associated Denver Bassett acting in the capacity of manager of the Boone County Chevrolet Co. The organization is housed in an especially constructed building on Main St. with a 60-foot frontage and a depth about the same. The business was one of the most successful in this territory, and was the only Chevrolet dealer in Boone and Gallatin Counties. They handled altogether about 500 cars each year, new and used. They kept a complete line of Chevrolets on display at all times including roadsters, phaetons, coupes, coaches, sedans, and trucks. This Chevrolet Dealership was located across the street from Walton City Hall.

   The old Walton Equitable Bank came to be in February 1927 when The Walton Bank and Trust Company merged. The capital stock totaled $50,000 and they had a $50,000 surplus with $30,000 in undivided profits and combined resources of $750,000.00. At the time of the merger the following respected and representative men were chose directors: R.C. Greene, President; J.D. Mayhugh, Vice President; D.B. Wallace, E.K. Stevens, Oliver Brown, G.N. Powers, A.M. Edwards, D.E. Dudley, J.C. Bedinger and R.E. Ryle. R.B. Brown and Chas. W. Ransler were also vice presidents with Alan H. Gaines secretary and E. Sleet West, cashier; J. Ben Doan and H.E. Metcalf as assistant cashiers. J.D. Mayhugh was later elected president, and upon his death in March 1930, Wilford Rice was selected to fill that high place making him the youngest bank president in the state. After the merger had been effected a beautiful new home for the bank was erected at a cost of $52,000.00. The two-story limestone building with one hundred foot frontage on the main street of Walton (currently US BANK).

 Interesting Tid-Bits

  • Around 1908, Dr. Menefee, Mr. Jones and Ralph Edwards owned the first cars in Walton. These cars were Buicks.

  • Main Street was the first street in Walton to be paved with concrete. It was paved for one mile from one end of Walton to the other. It was told that Clifton Mayhugh, proprietor of the J. D. Mayhugh Lumber Company, drove his family back and forth on this concrete street every Sunday.

  • In the early 1900’s Morphine was sold off grocery store shelves.

  • Roy Stamler owned an open-air theater on Main Street called the Air Dome. Movies were shown there and people sat on bleacher-type seats to watch them.

  • Mr. Moxley used to light the town lights every night. He also had a cow and sold milk to people. During this time, even people who lived on town had chickens. Some even had pigs and cows. Mr. Moxley lived where 11 South Main Street is now.

  •  In 1914 the city’s lights went out at midnight because that’s when the plant shut down for the night. Warren Stephenson operated the plant for Harry Mayfield of Mayfield Electric Company which was located across from today’s City Hall.

  • Walton has the distinction of having the first Laundromat, in 1921. Mr. Theodore Burdsall built a building on the east side of Main Street north of the railroad tracks (across from Walton Food Mart). The building housed Bendix washing machines and the dryers were metal housing that was heated with oil. There was a large cistern below getting water from the roof.

  • Many of the homes along Main Street were built during this period.

  • The Walton Canning Co. was owned by Mr. Metcalfe and located on Nicholson Avenue.

  • The Community Public Service Company was a utility company, which started serving electricity to several locations in Kentucky in the early 1920’s including Walton.

  • The present day Zion Baptist Church on Church Street was build in 1922

  • The basketball team from Walton won it's way to participate in the State Tournament in March 1928.

Walton Baseball Team

   Six teams signed up for the Boone County League in 1928: Walton, Burlington, Petersburg, Union, Hebron, and Belleview. The teams played a 20-week schedule.

   A Kentucky Post account from May 4, 1928, said Boone County Baseball fans were flocking to the games and the spirit of play was clean and under the direction of league commissioner John M. Lassing, who was a circuit court judge in Boone County. The Walton team was considered the best in the league. It also competed in the Northern Kentucky Semipro League. Clyde Laws was the team manager and center fielder.

   Walton and Belleview concluded the 1928 season playing a best-of-five series for the league championship. Belleview won the first game 2-0. Walton won the next two games, 11-6 and 16-9, and then claimed the championship 14-8 before a crowd of 1,300. Laws and his team received a gold trophy for their victory.

    Walton and Belleview again competed in a five-game playoff a year later. The teams split the first four games and played the deciding fifth game on a neutral field in Hebron. Umpires were brought in from outside the county. A Kentucky Post account on October 11, 1929, predicted one of the largest crowds in the history of Boone County baseball.

    The Walton manager was Ben Zimmer. In the ninth inning of a tie game, Zimmer put himself in as a pinch hitter. He laid down a perfect bunt, which surprised the Belleview players. Walton scored and won the game and league championship.

    The success of the league and particularly the Walton team were such that the Boone County Chevrolet dealership offered Chevrolets to transport the Walton players to games.

     Local baseball, on the scale of the early 1930 & 1940's, ended with World War II. After the war, softball became the game of choice for most returning veterans.
(The study of Northern Kentucky Baseball history was written by Jim Reis, a reporter for the Kentucky Post.. This is part of an account that appeared in the May 6, 2002 edition.)

1930's - 1940's


   Hundreds of Kentuckians were in the Civilian Conservation Crops or CCC, as it was commonly known. The CCC was just to be for unemployed men, ages 18-25, who came from needy families during the height of the Great Depression – and effectively ended in 1942 with America's involvement in World War II. The Army ran the CCC camps, but some were also connected with the Soil Conservation Service and specialized in aiding farmers with erosion and crop problems. Among those types of camps was the CCC camp in Walton. The Walton camp was located at the end of Alta Vista Drive where the present Walton-Verona High School Campus is located.

   The Walton camp started to take shape in the summer of 1935, when 23 men, under the command of Army Capt. Robert Adams, arrived in Walton to the old ballpark owned by John L. Vest.

    With four truck-loads of camping equipment and other supplies, they pitched 5 tents, converted the old ballpark grandstand into a makeshift kitchen and set about the task of converting the ballpark in to a CCC camp capable of housing up to 200 men at a time. In their first months, the 23 men dug ditches to bring a water line to the site, installed electric and telephone lines, and erected additional tents. The men used shower facilities at the school (85 N Main St.) to clean up in.

    On August 8, the small contingent was beefed up by the arrival of 152 enrollees by train from Covington and the enlistment of 17 local men from the Walton area. The men enlisted for a six-month period and were paid $30 a month. Of that amount, the man only got $5 the remaining $25 was mailed directly to the man’s family to help them through the hard financial times.

   Soon after the new men arrived at Walton, they were assigned the task of unloading 17 railroad cars filled with wood and other equipment shipped in from Albany, GA. These supplies were used to build the barracks, mess hall, educational center and other buildings that eventually made up the Walton CCC Camp.

   Life at the Walton camp usually began with a 6 a.m. breakfast and flag raising. The flagpole, which was a camp landmark, was erected on November 30, 1935, and rose 68 feet above the camp. Work details then started about 8 a.m. as the men were sent out in groups of 30 to 40. Most were assigned to farms, which were spread over Boone, Kenton, Gallatin, Pendleton, Grant, Nicholas and Bourbon counties. The men were usually brought a lunch on their job site around 1 p.m. and continued working until about 4 p.m. They then returned to camp for a 5 p.m. supper.

   In the evening the men could play a variety of sports, such as basketball, football and softball or use the camp’s library either to just read or take correspondence courses. An arrangement was also later made by which some men at the Walton camp were bused in the evenings to Simon Kenton High School in Independence, where they attended classes that could help them obtain a high school-equivalency degree. In their free time, men also could go to the Union Theater in Walton to catch a movie or later to its successor, the James Theater.

    By March of 1942 most of the young men in the age range of the CCC were either in the military, filling jobs vacated by other men who were in the service or working at new jobs created by the wartime economy.


   Statewide, the CCC program generated more than $19 million for the families of the 89,511 Kentucky enrollees and resulted in the planting of more than 26 million trees. Some men who served or were involved with the camp remained residents of our City. They were David Deaton, Gayle McElroy, Kenneth Brewer and Sam Gamble.

   In the middle of the 1940’s, the Community Public Service Company moved its home office from Winchester to Walton after the death of the general manager. Mr. R. M. (Russell) Hall was appointed Division Manager. The line crews were based at Walton and worked from there to perform maintenance work and build new lines.

Walton High School Basketball Team Goes to State Tournament

   The Walton High School Bearcats basketball team won the bid to play in the 25th Annual Kentucky High School Basketball Tournament in 1942. The tournament was played in the Jefferson County Armory in Louisville March 19 - 21. The Bearcats won their district by defeating Burlington High School, 64-18 and Hebron High School, 50-16. They went on to beat Hebron, 54-16; Simon Kenton High School, 40-28; and Holmes, 40-21 to win the Region and move on to State.


Front row, left to right: manager James Dudgeon, Charles (Hunky) Holder, Clifford Ryan, Harry D. Mayhugh, Ray Coyle, and manager, Jessie Thornton. Back row: Lawrence (Katie) Welsh, Stanley McElroy, Truitt (Plucker) DeMoisey, Russell Groger, Paul Simpson, and coach Lewis Shields. Missing is Leon Pennington.

Following is an article written by Henry Childress, KY Post Sports Editor

Walton Set to Make Trip to Tourney
Lengthy Practice Session Held to Prep for Meet
   
Coach Lew Shields and Principal Walter Coop completed plans Tuesday for the trip of the Walton Bearcats, Northern Kentucky basketball champions, to Louisville where they will play Thursday night in the opening round of the annual state tournament.
     The team will leave shortly after 5 p.m. Wednesday in private autos. In the group leaving Wednesday will be Coach Shields, 10 players, scorekeeper Bob Gordon and D. O. Dudgeon, student manager.
     Early Thursday a large contingent of Walton fans, headed by Principal Coop and cheer leaders Guy Carlisle, Ella Mae Chambers and Nelda Campbell will make the journey.
                                                      

Hold Practice
     The Bearcat players went through a lengthy practice session Monday on the Simon Kenton hardwood at Independence, using that big floor instead of their own because it is more nearly the size they will play on at the Louisville Armory.
     The players who will make the trip are the same 10 who played during the recent district and regional tournaments here.
     Seniors on the squad are Paul Simpson and Clifford Ryan, guards; Russell Groger, forward, and Stanley McElroy, center.
     Juniors are Truett DeMoisey, center; Harry Mayhue, and  Leon Pennington, guards.  Lawrence Welsh and Charles Holder, forwards, are sophomores, and Ray Coyle, a forward, is an eight grader.

Interesting Tid-Bits

  • John (Frenchy) DeMoisey  was  the  son of Rev. and Mrs. R. F. DeMoisey. He graduated from Walton High School and went on to be Adolph Rupp's first UK recruit. He had originally planned to attend Duke University but liked what Rupp had to say and Duke was soon forgotten. He brought his left-handed hook shot to UK in 1931. He was captain of the 1933-34 team and was named All American that year.

  • On April 1, 1931, Bonds were issued for the purpose of defraying the cost of establishing and erecting a municipal water system and plant to be owned and operated by said town (Walton). The bonds will be known as Waterworks (Revenue) Bonds, in which the principal amount was $35,000.

  • In the fall of 1935, the Walton and Verona schools were consolidated into the Walton-Verona Independent School District.

  • The Walton Homemakers began in 1936. It was one of the 10 Charter Clubs in Boone County.

  • In 1947 the Walton Volunteer Fire Department was formed. The first Chief was Jim Bob Allen.


    Year

    Trustees / Mayor

    City Clerk

    1942-1943
    November 1941 is the first recorded election for the1942-44 term.

    Dan L. Lusby, Chairman
    Dr. Robert E. Ryle
    Robert "Cameron" Brakefield
    Gilbert E. Groger
    J. Robert "Bob" Conrad

    D.H. Vest

         

    Year

    Trustees / Mayor

    City Clerk

    1944-1945

    Dan. L. Lusby, Chairman
    J. Willis Berkshire
    Robert Cameron Brakefield
    J. Robert Conrad
    Gilbert E. Groger

    D.H. Vest

         

    Year

    Trustees / Mayor

    City Clerk

    1946-1947

    D. L. Lusby, Chairman
    G. E. Groger
    J. R. Conrad
    J. W. Berkshire
    R. C. Brakefield

    D.H. Vest

    Year

    Trustees / Mayor

    City Clerk

    1948-1949

    Daniel J. Roberts, Chairman
    Russell M. "Coke" Hall
    George "Kyle" Nicholson
    Powers R. Conrad
    Frank M. DeMoisey

    Gayle Elroy

     

1950's - 1960's

    In September 1950, the first full-time Catholic Elementary School in the Walton-Verona area was opened at All Saints Church under the direction of the Sisters of St. Benedict. When the Sisters of St. Benedict were recalled from All Saints, the superiors at Nazareth were asked to send four Sisters to staff the School. Because of the small enrollment, the Sisters of Charity recalled the four Sisters after only three years and All Saints School was closed.

     The Ladies Auxiliary of the Walton Fire Department was formed in 1952. These ladies did a great job of assisting the Volunteers by providing hot meals, coffee and soft drinks during emergencies. One of those times was in 1957 when there was a train derailment that took five days to clean up. During that time the Ladies served meals to the Department, the train crews and others helping. The Ladies were also on the job at all the Firemen's Picnics. They served the food and made cake and other goodies for the Bingos and other functions.

     One of the worst disasters ever to hit the City struck Friday, July 13, 1956 at 4:00 p.m. and was over in about two minutes. The tornado started at the M. L. Carey farm on Beaver Road (Hwy. 1292) and ground its way through town out Locust street, finishing at the Chapman barn. In between these points, Walton received an estimated loss of $500,000 in property damage. The miracle of the tornado was that not a single life was lost. Beaver Road (Old Beaver Road) was hardest hit, with five homes completely destroyed and others badly damaged. Roofs were blown off and windows were broken at the Walton Feed Mill, the Tie Factory, and the Walton Skating Rink along North Main Street.
     Walton was declared a disaster, and traffic was rerouted around town so clean up crews could work. The Red Cross arrived on the scene and later established headquarters in the City Hall. At the Sunday Services, Rev. Joe Tackett of the First Baptist Church, and Rev. Atkinson of the Methodist Church suggested setting up collection stands for collecting money to help the victims. Councilman D. H. Vest counted 16 cars per minute passing through at the collection points. Mark Meadows, Editor of the Walton Advertiser, expressed in his column the overall generosity of the community, organizations and neighboring communities contributing money, time and labor for the restoration of the City.

     "Top Stars of Country and Western Music Booked At Verona Lake" were the headlines in the Walton Advertiser in April of 1957. Verona Lake Ranch was a 100 acre park, located behind the (old) Verona School and owned by Thurston and Georgie Moore, with a good fishing lake and a great entertainment all summer long. Fishing at the lake was $1.00 during the week, and $1.50 on the weekends. The outdoor amphitheater had new seating which seated 1,500 and the acoustics were perfect. Admission to the Sunday shows was only 75 cents, and children under 10 were free. Entertainers for the summer included: Jimmie Dickens, Ferlin Huskey, Jim Reeves, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, Lonzo and Oscar, Bill Monroe, Hank Snow, the Louvin Brothers and more. The shows were hosted by Miss Georgie whose amiable personality, cutting up, and dances made her a favorite with thousands of folks.  

      In June, 1957, the Beighle Brothers, Charles "Sam" and Paul, opened a small grocery store of approximately 2,000 square feet at 67 N. Main Street. They, along with nine other Greater Cincinnati grocers, became the Charter Members of the Independent Grocers Alliance, creating one of the first IGA stores in this area. The Beighle Brothers prospered and in 1959 they doubled the size of their store. In the years that followed, their brothers, Truett, Edward and Monty Beighle,  joined them.
    In 1964 they sold their business to Stan Jones and Dale Dowery. Jones operated the IGA store at 67 N. Main for several years but needed more room. After remodeling the James Theater, Jones moved the IGA to 51 N. Main Street (currently Walton Food Mart).
    Prior to this, the brothers operated a country store they  purchased from Harold and Florian Lusby in 1947 located at 104 N. Main Street (currently Main Street Cafe). During those days, items were kept behind the counter and the grocer waited on each individual customer.
 


Year Trustees/ Mayor Council

City Clerk

1948-1949

1950-51 Walton became a 5th Class City requiring appointment of 2 more trustees/council and appointment of Mayor.

Frank M. DeMoisey
Daniel J. Roberts
Powers R. Conrad
G. Kyle Nicholson
Russell M. Hall, Chairman
N/A Clearence Hoffman
       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

March 3, 1950 - 1951

R.M. Hall, appointed March 3, 1950

F. M. Demoisey
D. J. Roberts
P. R. Conrad
G. Kyle Nicholson
Glenn Eden, app April 13, 1950; resigned May 1, 1950
Nicholas "Nick" Welsh, appointed June 12, 1950

Clearence Hoffman

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1952-1953

R. M. Hall

P. R. Conrad
F. M. DeMoisey, resigned December 6, 1952
Leon Hall
Malcolm Simpson
James. W. Spencer
Gayle McElroy, appointed January 12, 1953
John W. Hartman

Clearence "C.W." Hoffman

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1954-1955

R. M. Hall

James. W. Spencer
Leon Hall
John Hartman
Malcolm Simpson
P. R. Conrad, resigned April 12, 1954
Gayle McElroy, resigned April 27, 1954
Lloyd Clements, appointed May 10, 1954
Clarence Hoffman, appointed May 1954
James Allphin
Harold L. Campbell
       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1956-1957

R. M. Hall, resigned March 1, 1957
Leon Hall, appointed March 11, 1957
Leon Hall
Randell Martin
G. Harris Moore
D. Hess Vest, resigned September 6, 1956
G. Kyle Nicholson
Travis Dunn, resigned November, 1956
Robert Stephenson, appointed December 10, 1956
Clifford Chance, appointed April 8, 1957
Harold L. Campbell
John Romes
       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1958-1959

Leon B. Hall

Randell Martin
Raymond Brewster
Chester Armstrong
Bryon Rector
Donald Stephenson
Robert Stephenson

John Romes

       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
1960-1961 Leon B. Hall Mary A. Yealy-Hutton
Nicholas Welsh, resigned April 11, 1960
Bryon Rector
Randell Martin
Robert Stephenson
Howard Feldhaus
A. Clinton Shields, appointed May 9, 1960
John Romes
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
1962-1963 Kelly Kennedy Howard Feldhaus
Robert Stephenson
Dale Stephens
Woodrow. W. Greene
Paul Simpson
Chester Armstrong
Daisy Hill
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
1964-1965 Kelly Kennedy
Paul Simpson, appointed April 23, 1964
Howard Feldhaus
Robert Stephenson
Dale Stephens
Paul Simpson
Woodrow W. Greene
Chester Armstrong
Robert Eisenschmidt, appointed April 23, 1964
Daisy Hill
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
1966-1967 K. Dale Stephens Howard Feldhaus
Robert Eisenschmidt
Woodrow W. Greene
Edward Berkemeier, resigned January 24, 1967
Carl Gerth
Albert Martin
Chester Armstrong, appointed January 24, 1967
Daisy Hill
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
1968-1969 K. Dale Stephens Woodrow W. Greene
Robert Eisenschmidt
Chester Armstrong
Carl Gerth, resigned May 27, 1969
Luther Stephens
Albert Martin
Guy O. Carlisle, appointed May 25, 1969
Daisy Hill

 

1970's - 1980's

      On February 11, 1971 the Walton Verona Elementary School was awarded a contract to build the new elementary school. Then on October 28 of the same year the 4th, 5th, and 6th grades of the Walton Verona Elementary School paraded from the old Elementary School located across from the current Verona Post Office, to their brand new Elementary School located on Porter Road. The Parade was lead by a Walton Verona School Bus and the Fire Department. Then on December 5, 1971 the new elementary school was dedicated with the attendance of 350 people.
      
     One of the most destructive fires in the history of Walton struck on April 9, 1971. The fire was caused by trash fire that got out of hand and was spread by the wind to one business to the next. The fire hit the businesses of the Boone County Drug Store, the Village Barber Shop, an adjoining house known as John's Place, and the Walton Garage. The damage estimated $250,000. Because of this fire an Ordinance was put into effect. This Ordinance stated the no person or persons will be able to burn trash.
      
     On October 21, 1971 the Standard Oil Station in Walton was robbed by 6 people who were caught later that night.
      
    On March 4, 1972 Ernest Perry, Ronald Swiger, and Anthony Garcia died in a small plane crash. The plane crashed into a hillside in a pasture just off High Street on Leonard Clifton's property. Willard Martin said that he saw the plane come straight down and crash into the hillside. The plane hit so hard that it drove the motor deep into the ground, and  it tore off the wings and tail section. The fire from the wreckage was so minor that it only took two small fire extinguishers and four buckets of water to put the flames out.
      
     Zion Baptist Church celebrated it Centennial on June 18th of 1972. The hundred year old church was founded by Rev. and Mrs. John Green, George Chatman, Daniel Williams, John Williams, Courtney Watkins, and Rev. Soloman Watkins. The first pastor was Rev. Soloman Watkins who was buried by the side of the church on the hill directly behind the present church.
      
     At age 25 Denny Taylor of Walton released his first album in July of 1972.
      
    On October 4, 1972 Paul Tuemler LP Gas Sales and Service Plant on Nicholson Road was hit by a fire. The fire was thought to be caused by bad electrical wiring, but the real cause wasn't known. The damage estimate was $15,000.
      
    The Old Wooden Bridge on Needmore Street gave way under the weight of a truck and was immediately closed to traffic on November 24, 1972. This blocked the road for many vehicles, and a alternate route had to be taken. The repair took approximately 2-3 weeks.
       
     On December 8, 1972 Governor Wendell Ford announced that the City of Walton will receive  $258,000  in federal monies, and a state loan of $156,000. This was to help the waste treatment facilities. On November 4,1974 Walton held a dedication ceremony for its new 3 million dollar sewer system. That same day it also had its Ground Breaking Ceremony where mayor Sam Gamble broke ground for the new project.
      
     Walton experienced very heavy winds on March 24, 1975. The winds were so severe that Ryan's Hardware Store received $12,000 - $15,000 in damage. Ryan's was hit the hardest by the winds.

       On November 3, 1975 the Walton IGA had a ribbon cutting ceremony to dedicate the new store located at the current Walton Food Mart.
      
     The Senior Citizen Project (Walton Village) Ground Breaking Ceremony was held on October 5, 1976. The building is located at 35 School Road across from the High School. This is the first Senior Citizen Housing Project that has occurred in Walton.
      
      In mid November, 1976 the old Opera House was demolished. This was an upset to many people in town. The Opera House  (Old Model Food Store) was a landmark and it offered amusement at any time of the day. The Opera House was demolished to build the new Model Food Store (currently the Outreach Fellowship Center of the First Baptist Church).

       In 1976 Steve Cauthen made racing headlines at age 16 by winning 240 races, a record for an apprentice jockey. The next year his 487 winning rides and $6 million in purse earning set new records and landed him on the cover of Sports Illustrated twice, plus led to 3 Eclipse Awards. Then on April 1, 1977 Mayor Sam Gamble declared that April 1st was officially known as Steve Cauthen Day. Then on August 30 the Kentucky Junior Chambers of Commerce chose 10 people to receive the Outstanding Young Kentuckians Award. Steve Cauthen was chosen to be one of these ten people. Then in 1978 at age 18, Cauthen became the youngest jockey to win racing's Triple Crown aboard Affirmed. The next year Cauthen moved to Europe and was a 3 time leading rider in England (1984, 85, & 87). Cauthen is the only rider to win 5 major Derby's: The Kentucky Derby, England's Epson Derby, The French Derby, The Irish Derby, and The Italian Derby. For more information on Steve Cauthen visit http://www.cityofwalton.org.way_back_stub/Cauthen.htm#top
      
     The Boone County Carpet Mills located at 16 South Main Street (currently a parking lot) caught on fire and was destroyed on Feb 26, 1977. The Fireman went and put out the fire and left. When they got home the were called out a second time because it caught fire again. While trying to fight the fire Tommy McIntyre fell though the floor but was not badly injured. The fire was thought to be started by the furnace, but the real cause in unknown.
      
       The ground breaking for the Walton Christian Church's new Christian Educational Building took place on August 30, 1977

Year Mayor Council City Clerk

1970-1971

K. Dale Stephens, resigned June 15, 1971
Guy O. Carlisle, appointed June 15, 1971
Woodrow Greene
Robert Eisenschmidt
Chester Armstrong
Luther Stephens
Donald McMillian
Guy O. Carlisle, appointed Mayor June 15, 1971
Roger Augenstein, appointed August 17, 1971

Daisy Hill

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1972-1973

Dallas Justice

James Allphin
Jack Norris
William "Bill" Robinson
Lloyd Poore, resigned August 7, 1973
Roger Augenstien, resigned September 30, 1972
Sam Gamble
Wilford Rice, appointed October 10, 1972
John Hartman Sr., appointed August 7, 1973
Daisy Hill
Brenda Johnson
Daisy Hill
Anna Mae Simpson
       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1974-1975

Sam Gamble

D. H. Vest
Kyle Nicholson
David Peebles
Roscoe Denney
Jack Norris
Byron Kent

Anna Mae Simpson

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1976-1977

Sam Gamble

William Locke
Jack Norris
Charles "Chick" Worthington, resigned December 29, 1977
D. Hess Vest
Roscoe Denney
Byron Kent
Donald McIntyre, appointed January 10, 1978

Anna Mae Simpson

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1978-1979

William "Bill" King

Rev. William Johnson
George Raybourne
Hess Vest, resigned September 1, 1978
Earl Abshire
Lloyd Burden
Donald McIntyre
George "Ab" Ryan, appointed September 5, 1978

Anna Mae Simpson

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1980-1981

William "Bill" King

George Ryan
M. Deane Poore
Charles Mitchell
Rev. William Johnson
Albert Showalter
Donald McIntyre

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1982-1983

George "Ab" Ryan

Chester Armstrong
Earl Abshire
Clayton Jones
M. Deane Poore
Rev. William Johnson
Bill Leicht, resigned May 9, 1983
Hugh Tharpe, appointed June 30, 1983; resigned August 31, 1983
Roscoe Denney, appointed September 19, 1983

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1984-1985

George "Ab" Ryan

Clayton Jones
Chester Armstrong
M. Deane Poore
Earl Abshire, resigned June 4, 1984
Bill Wethington, appointed June 18, 1984
Rev. William Johnson, resigned August 6, 1985
Wm. "Bill" King
Johnnie Ann Johnson, appointed August 19, 1985

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1986-1987

William King

Clayton Jones
Johnnie A. Johnson
John Rich
Chester Armstrong
William "Bill" Wethington
Anna Mae Simpson

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1988-1989

William King

Clayton Jones
John Rich
Terry Sallee
Donna Scroggins
Anna M. Simpson
Brenda Robinson

Ruth Glenn

 

1990's - 2000's

     In 1996, a detachment of Carrolton's Battery A, 2/138th Field Artillery was established in Walton. This company is still located in Walton. Although the unit has never been involved in an overseas conflict, a few members of the Guard served in Desert Storm with the 207th Maintenance Company.

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1990-1991

William King

Rose Beach
Anna Mae Simpson, deceased May, 1991
David Peebles, appointed May 1991
Clayton Jones
Art Meisberger
John Rich
Donna Scroggins, resigned February 11, 1991
Gil Turner, appointed February 11, 1991

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1992-The council elect had to
draw their 1 or 2 year term from
a hat presided over by City Attorney
Terry Edwards.
Those drawing a 1-year term
would be filing a nominating
petition to run in the 1992 election
if they chose to do so.

William King

Dave Peebles, 1-year
Maynard Meadows, 2-years
Jim Ferguson, 1-year
Clayton Jones, 2-years
Art Meisberger, 2-years
John Taylor, 1 year

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1992-1993

William King

John Taylor
Art Meisberger
Jim Ferguson
Maynard Meadows
Sharon McDonald
Clayton Jones

Ruth Glenn

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1994-1995

Phillip W. Trzop

John Taylor
William "Bill" Conatser
Clayton Jones
Sharon McDonald
Mike Rowland
Jim Ferguson, resigned July  7, 1994
Don Bowman, appointed August 8, 1994
Ruth Glenn,
Voni Pierce
       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1995-1996

Phillip W. Trzop

Bill Conatser
Charles "Chick" Worthington
Clayton Jones
Don Bowman
Mike Rowland
Sharon McDonald

Voni Pierce

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1997-1998

Phillip W. Trzop

Art Meisberger
Clayton Jones, deceased March 13, 1997
Debbie Moffett, appointed April 10, 1997
Don Bowman
Mike Rowland
Mike Wood
Sharon McDonald

Ann Leake

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

1999-2000

Phillip W. Trzop

Dan Simpson
Mike Wood
Mike Rowland
Sharon McDonald
Mike Cason, resigned January 2000
Donald Bowman, resigned January 2000
Richard Roberts, appointed January 10, 2000
Jeffery Franklin, appointed January 11, 2000

Ann Leake

       

 Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

2001-2002

Phillip W. Trzop

Anna Palmer
Lee R. Frakes
Mark A. Watts
Mike Cason, resigned August, 2002
Mike Wood
Ramona Roberts, appointed September 9, 2002
Richard Roberts
Ann Leake,
Joyce Bryan,
Peggy Gray
       

 Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk

 2003-2004

 Phillip W. Trzop

Ann Leake
Betty Hensley, resigned December 31, 2003
Stephanie Williams, appointed January 12,  2004
Mike Simpson
Mike Wood
Paula Jolley
Richard Roberts

Peggy Gray

       

Year

Mayor

Council

City Clerk
2005-2006 Phillip W. Trzop
Paula Jolley
Ann Leake
Richard Roberts, resigned August 31, 2005
Wayne Carlisle, appointed Sept. 12, 2005
Mike Simpson
Stephanie Williams
Peggy Gray,
Joyce Bryan
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
2007-2008 Phillip W. Trzop Wayne Carlisle
Lee R. Frakes
Paula Jolley
Ann Leake
Mike Simpson
Stephanie Williams

Peggy Gray,
Joyce Bryan
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
2009 -2010 Phillip W. Trzop Wayne Carlisle
Paula Jolley
Ann Leake
Sharon McDonald
Mike Simpson
Stephanie Williams, resigned May, 2009
Lee Frakes, appointed May, 2009
Peggy Gray,
Joyce Bryan
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
2011 - 2012 Wayne Carlisle, resigned Nov. 20, 2011
Paula Jolley, appointed Nov. 21, 2011

Craig Brandenburg
Mark Carnahan
Paula Jolley
Ann Leake, deceased June 5,
2011
Nicole Mize, appointed Nov. 14, 2011
Kevin Ryan
Mike Simpson
Mike Wood, appointed Dec. 12, 2011

Peggy Gray,
Joyce Bryan
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
2013-2014 Phillip W. Trzop, resigned May, 2013
Mark Carnahan, appointed May 27, 2013

Olivia Ballou, resigned June 2013
Rick Cook, appointed Oct. 9,
2013
Gabe Brown
Matt Brown
Mark Carnahan
Rose Beach, appointed June,
2013
Margie Stewart
Mike Wood
Peggy Gray,
Joyce Bryan
       
Year Mayor Council City Clerk
2015 - 2016 Mark Carnahan, elected Nov., 2014 Rose Beach
Gabe Brown
Matt Brown
Margie Stewart
Dan Simpson
Mike Wood
Peggy Gray,
Joyce Bryan

 

The Gaines House

A Brief History

     The Abner Gaines House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, was likely built sometime around 1814.  On January 1, 1809, 192 acres was purchased by Gaines from Caleb Summers for $1,666.66. Then in November, 1813 Gaines purchased 200 acres from Thomas and Dinah Kennady for $1,810.30.

     From as early as c. 1795, Archibald Reid ran a tavern on this site, fronting what would become the Covington & Lexington Turnpike, and was active in the early formation of Boone County in 1798. James Mathews, the brother of Elizabeth Mathews Gaines, worked with Reid. The Abner Gaines family apparently resided at this location since their arrival in 1804.  Abner Gaines was issued a tavern license in 1808, which indicates that a house was already standing by this time. The license allowed him "to keep a tavern at his dwelling house in the county of Boone...and provide in his said tavern good wholesome cleanly lodging and diet for travellers and stableage provender or paustrage for horses.." The license also stated that Abner "shall not suffer or permit any unlawful gaming in his house nor suffer any person to tipple or drink more than is necessary or at any time suffer any disorderly or scandalous behavior to be practiced in his house." The license was renewed every year or two until December 1818. In 1813, Abner purchased the land "where he now resides", leading to speculation that this grand home may have not been constructed until c. 1814. The community around the house became known as Gaines Cross Roads, and a United States Post Office was established here in 1815 with Abner’s son, James M. Gaines, as the Postmaster. The town of Walton, just south of Gaines, was not officially established until 1840.

            In 1818, Abner Gaines began the first stagecoach line between Cincinnati and Lexington, which made one round trip weekly. The trip took over 24 hours, and the Gaines House may have been a lengthy meal and rest stop. Although it is unknown how long the stagecoach line ran, the house continued to be utilized as a tavern and inn for many years. It was sold out of the Gaines family to Dr. Elijah Smith Clarkson in 1844, and a c. 1897 newspaper article discussed the possibility of the house being razed. More research is necessary to discover why it was spared, but the house was used as an inn, a barn, apartments, and finally to house the antique collections of John Gault, who bought it in 1937. The outbuildings were apparently constructed by the Gault's to help house the growing business, including a fine collection of vintage cars.

Architecture

      The two story Abner Gaines House is built in the Federal style of architecture, and constructed of brick, likely made and fired on site. The house had stucco applied to the exterior in the early part of the twentieth century, but traces of Flemish bond brickwork are visible on the front of the house with a common pattern used on the sides and rear. The central passage house features seven openings across the front with six over six double hung windows and an elaborate entrance with a three part elliptical fanlight and sidelights.
    
     The small front porch is likely not original, but is of early to mid-nineteenth century construction. A third floor dormer window was also added at a later date. There is dentil detailing along the narrow cornice of the house, and all the windows and the front entrance feature jack arches.

      Although it remains speculative, it is likely that the construction of the Abner Gaines House was a combined effort of local craftsmen, and skilled African American slaves. Most, if not all, the materials were probably obtained locally, perhaps from the Gaines property itself. The interior of the house has an abundance of delicately carved Federal woodwork and mantles. This may well be the most elaborately detailed historic home still standing in Boone County today.

     The original house was two rooms over two rooms with an attic, using mortise and tenon, pegged framing. A later ell, or addition, was apparently constructed by the mid-nineteenth century adding much more space to the house. Original decorative details were copied for use in the ell, although some in more simple patterns. A second floor side gallery originally ran the length of the addition, although a rear portion was subsequently enclosed to be a small room. This is part of a frame section that was added to the ell. The clapboard covering a portion of the exterior of this addition was salvaged from an 1888 house demolished to make way for Erpenbeck Elementary School in Union.

     The outbuildings in the rear of the house were likely constructed in the mid-twentieth century. The floors in the guest house were from the c. 1835 Smith House, which was formerly located on Idlewild Road, and demolished several years ago by the airport. Mr. Gjerde constructed the built-in furniture on the second floor of the guest house. The original cottage was located next to the existing guest house.

 Gaines Tavern History Center Photo Tour         

Entrance Hall

     Like many early nineteenth century houses, the Gaines House has a grand entrance hall that features an initial look at the architectural treasures to come. An entrance detail to note is the handsome six panel front door with its detailed fanlights, three pane sidelights, fluted trim and original door hardware. The parlor, or chamber, doors to your right and left, also have elliptical fanlights and carved detailing.

    

 

    It is difficult to miss the commanding three story staircase that features hand carved details along the side, a cherry balustrade, tiger maple spindles on the lower portion (likely a later replacement), original cherry spindles and newels on the upper portion, and wide low steps. From a structural point of view, the deep door openings and wide window sills (visible in the two parlors) are indications that the house is of timber frame, or pegged, construction, which will be more readily apparent in the attic. You can also begin to get an idea of the importance of symmetry, or balanced proportions, in the Federal style of architecture. Houses of this period, especially in the South, were also designed for maximum air circulation, although the original air flow patterns have frequently been altered by later building additions and changes.

 

From the Front Entrance, please turn right into the North Parlor

     An original feature, the magnificent fireplace and mantle on the north wall, draws your attention when entering the north parlor. The mantle features intricate sunburst carving with a fan motif and chevron detailing (present as a decorative detail throughout the house). Small closets on either side of the mantle are carved to blend in, and open for storage. To the right of the fireplace is a large round arch cupboard that initially appears to blend in with the detailing of the mantle. The placement of this cupboard, however, violates the symmetrical appearance of this wall. The details are quite different than the others found in the house, and it was likely added later. It’s possible that former long-time owner John Gault, an antique dealer, found the cupboard in his travels and had it installed here.

     At some point in the life of the Gaines House, two of the three windows had been filled in. When the Gjerdes bought the house, water damage and deteriorating joists had caused the wall to fail and the lintels at the tops of windows were collapsing into the room. Work on the wall began by slowly jacking up the house and providing steel reinforcement. Pieces of original window trim and sills from the original center rear window that remained open were preserved. The wall was originally four bricks thick and, as it is rebuilt, those dimensions will remain the same. Brick from the interior of the wall was used to rebuild and exterior "veneer" and a portion of the remaining interior space will be used for necessary mechanical (primarily plumbing and HVAC) lines as well as insulation. The rear windows were  rebuilt by a local craftsman to match both the symmetry, size and detail of the front windows.   
     The flooring and baseboards in this room have been replaced, perhaps after a portion of the house was used as a barn in the early twentieth century.

From the North Parlor, please go upstairs to the second floor

     As you climb the stairs to the second floor, note how easily the stairs flow, making a long climb seem much less difficult. As the staircase turns, look up to the third floor and the original cherry newel posts as they decoratively drop just below the stairs. The center hall on the second level could easily be used as a small room.

 

 From the top of the stairs, please turn left   

     The two primary rooms in this grouping show a distinct change in overall room scale, but the details remain the same. The similar (although not matching) carved corner fireplace mantles are wonderful miniature versions of those found in the first floor parlors. The wall curves slightly to meet the fireplace, and features a small section of carved baseboard. The second floor of a nineteenth century house was often considerably simpler in detail and dimension, as it was considered private space as opposed to the more public spaces below. The windows in the northwest room, over the north parlor below, were not covered but had been seriously compromised by the failing wall.

     Portions of the woodwork in this room have been stripped of paint to reveal original detailing. The plaster walls in this room also show ghosts of former wallpaper, which was likely originally used in many of the rooms.

     The smaller room in this suite is now a bathroom, complete with cabinetry and a galvanized zinc tub.

                    

 

From this suite of rooms, please proceed upstairs to the third floor

     Continuing upstairs, the third floor of the house is a traditional attic space. The originally open area at the top of the steps was filled in at a much later date, but there is still enough space for a small room in the center hall. The window in the center is part of an attic dormer not original to the house.

     The large rooms on either side of the hall offer good views of the mortise and tenon, pegged framework of the house.  We believe the wood used for framing is chestnut, although that is not certain. These may have been rooms for rent at one time.

 

Please go back downstairs to the second floor and turn right

      This room features another beautifully carved mantle with sunburst and fan details, cupboards on either side, simple window frame detailing, and wide plain baseboards. This fireplace demonstrates the late nineteenth century practice of closing in large openings for coal wood burning stoves. The floor was apparently originally unfinished, but at some point, it was painted around the edges of existing area rugs. This room faces east.

 

Please go down the steep steps CAREFULLY at the rear of the room

      Steep steps lead down to the ell, or later addition, to the house. Although an exact construction date has not been determined, this portion of the house was likely added after the middle of the nineteenth century. The fireplace mantle in this room is much plainer, although its simple carved detail may have been copied from the earlier designs. Also the baseboards are narrower, there are nine over six windows, and the door frames and window sills are less deep (indicating a different type of framing). Also featured is a built in corner cupboard with the same eight panel doors as the cupboards on either side of the fireplace in the front room.

 

 

From the interior room, continue back to the next room

     This interior room features yet another carved mantle and the later addition of a closet.

     Off the rear room is a small room created when the originally full length gallery was enclosed. Here there are smaller windows (with old glass), and what may be an original (to the time of the gallery) closet. When the Gjerdes removed the linoleum that covered the floor they found news-papers dated the week before the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, and handwritten Burpee Flower Seed packs dated 1919.                   

Returning to the large rear room, go downstairs to the first floor

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

     At  the foot of the staircase, note the later addition of a bookcase, and an original fireplace mantle that features the same detail as the mantle upstairs. This is the only mantle in the house that was never painted. For an unknown reason, the window at the bottom of the stairs is unusually deep (for the ell), and features the now familiar carved chevron detailing. 

     

      Continue left to the rear door into the "dressing room" which in earlier days was probably mud room.

This room has an exterior door to the brick back porch.  

 

 

Go to the next room through the double doors

     

  This room has several features that are different from other rooms in the house. Its elaborate mantle is larger than the chimney face, and features an exuberant collection of decorative details (many actually from a period earlier than the house’s construction), leading to speculation that it may have been added later (another find by Mr. Gault perhaps?).
     The windows and doors exhibit the same carved detail as that are found in the original part and one rear door shows the only signs of graining, a popular nineteenth century decorative detail, found in the house. This room also has an exterior door on the south wall, with a simple fanlight, and a smaller version of the entrance porch on the front of the house. There was a limestone step outside the door that showed considerable wear (no longer visible). All these factors indicate that this door may have originally led to a public room.

Go up the steep steps CAREFULLY to the south parlor

    

     This original room features what is perhaps the best example of a Federal style "wall" in the entire house. The elaborately carved mantle surrounds a large fireplace, complete with its original pot crane. On either side, floor to ceiling cupboards offer simple but elegant carved doors and extensive storage space. The floor in this room was raised approximately one foot, completed slowly over a period of time.

 

Exit to the entrance hall and out the front door  

There is a basement under the rooms of the "ell". There are some original wood shakes from the roof stored there, as well as shutters for the windows. The shutters may be re-installed on the house after outside renovation is complete. Also in the basement are shelves built to store food.

Walton Christian Church

The History of the Walton Christian Church, appeared in Vol. I, No. 1 of the church newsletter in 1938.  The author is Rev. J. M. Ervin. 
 

The history of the Walton Christian Church dates back to the year 1875. In that year the small group of Disciples who had located in and around Walton called Rev. J.W. Beasley to conduct a revival meeting. This meeting was held in the Baptist Church, then located on Church Street. Another meeting followed in 1876, resulting in the organization of the First Christian Church. Rev. Beasley was called to be its first pastor. For a period of about three years services were held in the Masonic and I.O.O.F. hall, and in the school house, which stood at that time at the fork of the Stephenson Mill Road and the Beaver Grade. Sometime during the latter part of this period the congregation held a Church Festival and made $125.00, which was used to purchase a lot for a building of their own. The first site decided upon lay between High and Church Streets. Feeling that this was not the most desirable location, Mr. Adam Senours contributed $80-.00 more to purchase a site on High Street. Mr. Stephen Waite, Mr. Warren Lermond, and Mrs. James (Jimmie) Saunders led in a movement to erect a permanent structure for this group. Mr. Waite, along with other members of the church, razed and moved the old Antioch Christian Church building that stood on Banklick Creek near Banklick Station to this site. The timbers in this old building, along with some material donated by the L&N Railroad and others, were used in constructing the church that was erected and dedicated in 1879.

Among the charter members were: Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Waite, Mr. and Mrs. George Ransler, Mrs. Fred Schafer, Mr. H.C. Dahling, the Senours, Mrs. Hiram Fry and daughters, Emma and Mary, Mrs. Lucy Durr, Mrs. J.C. Cross, and Mrs. Fannie Stephens and others. Some of the early leaders in addition to the charter members were: Mr. Will Ransler, Mrs. Luella Watson, Mr. Robert Cleek and family, Miss Barbara Gibbs, Mrs. Nane Vest, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Percival, Mr. and Mrs. George Lipp; Robert, Foster, and Flem Jones, Mr. James Saunders, and Mr. Warren Lermond. The Church from its beginning enjoyed a normal growth.During the first years, such men as R.B. Neal, R.T. Matthews, W.W. Ridgeway, Rev. Stanley, Rev. Perkins, James Lawson, J.W. Rogers, along with Rev. Beasley, held successful revivals. Those who are still living speak in highest terms of appreciation for their service. Such men as H.W. Elliot, George Peale, Rev. Vawter, L.A. Kohler, Walter M. White, Russell Briney, Richard Wallace, R.E. Moss and others as noted, served the congregation as pastors in days gone by.

With the turning of the century more rapid progress was made. In May, 1905 a movement was initiated to "have preaching two Sundays in the month instead of one." No record is available of the month or year this objective was realized. But in the years that followed the church grew in numbers and its influence extended. In 1911 the individual communion service was introduced, a gift from Mrs. Art Stamler. There were improvements added from time to time. Like all other churches it had its hardships to overcome, but in spite of these it moved steadily forward.

In 1916 Rev. E.C. Lacy was called to be the first full time pastor of the church. Under his leadership, the present building was erected. It was dedicated on May 5, 1918 by Rev. C.W. Cauble of Indianapolis, Indiana (now deceased), at a cost of approximately $20,000. A large portion of this was raised on the day of dedication. Following this event, Milo Atkinson then of Memphis, Tennessee led the church in a two weeks revival. In the twenty years that have elapsed since the dedication, the attendance and membership have almost doubled. In 1937 the basement was completed and all indebtedness wiped out. Ministers who have served the church during this period are: E.C. Lacy, J.D. Waters, A.C. Brooks, G.W. Nutter, E.C. Boose, Rev. Erenfight, Sam Allen, C.A. Woesner, and J.M. Ervin.

(This history compiled and written by J.M. Ervin, May 5, 1938)

OFFICIAL BOARD FOR YEAR 1938

ELDERS: C.S. Chambers, chairman; Clayton Percival, vice-chairman; Oscar Chandler, treasurer; C.W. Ransler, Robert Moore, and J.G. Pennington.

DEACONS: Ben Menke, V.D. James, secretary; Harris Moore, Walter Whitson, Ben Doan, and Stanley Bush.

ANNUAL COMMITTEES

FINANCE: Oscar Chandler, chairman, J.G. Pennington, Stanley Bush, Mrs. Walter Whitson, and Gilbert Groger.

PULPIT & WORSHIP: C.W. Ransler, chairman; Clayton Percival, C.S. Chambers, Harris Moore, V.D. James, Miss Florence Elmore, and Mrs. Olivia Wills.

PROPERTY & CARE: Clayton Percival, chairman, Wallace Grubbs, S.W. Durr, Miss Lib Ingram, Mrs. Helen Conrad.

TREASURER REPORT FOR FIRST FOUR MONTHS

Receipts: By envelope: $612.55, Loose Offering: $42.22, Total $654.77.

Expenditures: Total $649.51

Balance, May 1st $5.26.

  

HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH SUNDAY SCHOOL

The history of the Sunday School dates back to the organization of the church. In the beginning attendance was small, but when the church moved into its own building in 1879, greater interest was taken in the Sunday School. Rev. Beasley, the first pastor, was a great believer in the Sunday School. Even upon the Sundays when there was no preaching service, Sunday School was held and the Lord's Supper observed. These services did much to keep up interest among the members of the church and to strengthen their spiritual life. Mr. Stephen Waite and Mr. George Ransler were among the first superintendents. In those days literature was not so easily accessible as now, and Sunday School lessons consisted mainly of reading of the Bible and comments by the teacher. During the first forty years of its history the attendance was increased to an average of more than sixty per Sunday. The story of its growth in the last twenty years can best be told in the following chart:
Superintendents who have served during this period are: C.W. Ransler, V.P. Kerns, B.F. Stansifer, C.S. Chambers, Oscar Chandler, Nick Welsh. Mr. Chambers is now serving a second term. Last year the total offering for local expenses was $227.27, and about $40.00 for missions.

The present officers of the Sunday School are: C.S. Chambers, superintendent; Nick Welsh, asst. superintendent; Miss Florence Elmore, secretary; Miss Luke Gordon, asst. secretary, Miss Lib Ingram, treasurer; Miss Marjorie Conrad, pianist, and Mrs. Olivia Wills, asst. pianist.

Since 1935 separate worship services have been held for the members of the Beginners, Primary, and Junior classes. Mrs. Naomi Wilhoit, Miss Virginia Moore, and Mrs. J.M. Ervin have served as leaders for this group.

Present teachers of the Sunday School are: Men's Class, V.D. James; Ladies Class, Mrs. Robert Moore; Willing Workers, C.W. Ransler, Older Young People, Wallace Grubbs; Young People, J.M. Erving, Intermediates, Mrs. Harris Moore; Junior, Mrs. Helen Conrad; Primary, Mrs. E.N. Steeley; Beginners, Mrs. Stanley Bush.

HISTORY OF THE LADIES AID SOCIETY

The history that follows is taken from the minutes of the society as of October 15, 1936, and was written for the society by Mrs. Barbara Ransler, one of the charter members.

"The Walton Christian Church on High Street was built in 1879. About 5 years later, Oct. 1, 1884 the Ladies Aid Society was organized under the direction of Rev. Perkins, the minister at that time. Fourteen members were enrolled, three of which are still living: Mrs. Louella Watson, Mrs. Fannie Chambers, and Mrs. Barbara Ransler. Mrs. Laura Youell was the first president. Mrs. Emma Lermond was the first secretary-treasurer. Later on when the membership increased this office was divided. The president was often changed, but not so with the secretary and treasurer. They had become accustomed to the work so we thought it best to keep them longer. It is needless to say how we worked, but 'I think the best thing we ever did was to secure the lot on which the new church now stands.' It is a great pleasure to see the society growing in numbers and spirit."

The purpose of this organization is to lend assistance to the church in any way that it can. Its present work consists mainly in keeping up the parsonage and supporting special projects in the church. There are about fifty members enrolled. Its income is derived from dues and special projects. The meetings are held in the homes of its members. An annual meeting is held at the church in October.

Present officers of the society are: Mrs. Helen Conrad, president; Mrs. Georgia Arnold, vice president, Mrs. Lula Huey, secretary; Mrs. Irene Bush, corresponding secretary; Mrs. George Fisher, Treasurer.

 

HISTORY OF THE WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY

The women's Missionary Society was organized in December 1919. Mrs. Louise Loos Campbell, then president of the Kentucky Woman's Board of Missions, came to Walton at the invitation of Mrs. A.P. Stephens. A meeting was held with a number of the ladies of the church attending, and a Missionary Society was organized. Twelve charter members were enrolled, most of whom are still living: Mrs. Stella Showers (deceased), Mrs. Susan Hance (deceased), Mrs. G.R. Rankin, Mrs. C.W. Ransler, Mrs. A.P. Stephens, Miss Lib Ingram, Miss Alpha Hance, Mrs. Estelle Grodon, Mrs. C.S. Chambers, Mrs. Robert Moore, Mrs. Addie Bush, Mrs. Lena Mann. Rev. A.C. Brooks, pastor at that time was made an honorary member.

The first Officers were: Mrs. A.P. Stephens, president; Mrs. G.R. Rankin, vice president; Mrs. G.W. Ransler, secretary; Mrs. Stella Showers, treasurer. Mrs. Stephens served the organization 14 continuous years as president and another term of two years later. Other presidents have been Mrs. R.G. Moore, Mrs. Walter King, and Mrs. Harris Moore.

The purpose of the organization is to promote the missionary enterprise, both by supporting the missionary work on the home and foreign fields and by creating interest in the cause in the local church. At one time there were 78 members. The largest offering ever given in a single year was $800, during the Golden Jubilee Celebration. At present there are 35 to 40 members, and the financial goal is $120.00.

Present officers are: Mrs. Harris Moore, president, Mrs. Lena Mann, vice president, Miss Lib Ingram, treasurer, Mrs. Gilbert Groger, treasurer, Mrs. Sam Sleet, literature secretary.

HISTORY OF THE WILLING WORKERS

The Willing Workers Class was organized in the fall of 1925. Up until this time the class of young ladies, taught by Mr. C.W. Ransler, had never taken up a special project of its own. After Mrs. J.C. Acree, a former resident of the Ky. Widows and Orphans Home, came into the class, she made a motion that the class support one orphan in the home. This involved the raising of $100 per year, and necessitated some kind of organization. After a visit by J.S. Hilton and some of the girls, an organization was affected and the name Willing Workers adopted. Mrs. J.C. Acree was elected as the first president. Mr. Ransler was chosen as its sponsor.

As the class grew, it accepted the support of two orphans. The money for the support of these orphans has been raised by dues from members of the class. Other special projects such as plays, Garden Parties, and bakery sales have been sponsored by the class for the purpose of raising money. Besides supporting two orphans, the class makes liberal donations to charity and special projects conducted by the church. The following have served as president of the organization: Mrs. Acree, Mrs. Walter King, Mrs. Olivia Wills, Mrs. Helen Hume, Mrs. Dwight Weber, Mrs. Walter Whitson, Mrs. Catherine Fegan, Mrs. Nell Campbell.

The class has grown from a membership of 25 to 55. In 1936 the Young Men's Class and this class were consolidated, retaining the name Willing Workers. The class has contributed in the past twelve years $1,650 to the home, and now holds thirty-three life memberships.

Present officers are: Mrs. Olivia Wills, president; Mrs. Mary Alice Conrad, vice president; Miss Mary Ransler, secretary; Mrs. Nell Campbell, asst. secretary; Lyle Clemons, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Aileen Conner, treasurer. Mrs. C.W. Ransler has taught this class for thirty-one years.

THE CHRISTIAN YOUTH COUNCIL

The young people's organization, known as the Christian Youth Council is the newest organization of the church. Its history dating back only to March 20, 1938. The young people recognizing the need of closer fellowship and a deeper Christian experience, banded themselves together in the Christian Youth Council. The following officers were elected: Johnny Mayhugh, president; Charlie Ransler, vice president; Blanche Brittenhelm, secretary, and Marjorie Conrad, pianist. Mrs. Irene Bush, Mrs. Inda Lee Arnold, and Nick Welsh were chosen advisors. J.M. Erwin was selected as sponsor.

Programs are conducted each Sunday night by the young people, and a social is held once a month. Charlie Ransler has charge of the worship period, and the programs are under the direction of four group leaders; Luke Gordon, Ora Violet Bush, Marjorie Conrad and Johnny Gault. The general topics are as follows: 1st Sunday, "World Happening;" 2nd Sunday, "Heroes and Rogues of the Bible," 3rd Sunday, "Favorite Hymns and the Stories Behind them;" 4th Sunday, "Great Personalities." The fifth Sunday is observed as a missionary Sunday.

A number of the young people are planning to attend the Young People's Conference at Camp Ernst again this summer.

THE WALTON CHRISTIAN

We hope that you like this first edition of our new church paper. If you would like to have it published once a quarter, let us hear from you. We trust that you will recognize that in compiling a history from memory is a difficult task and that mistakes are inevitable.

Walton Methodist Church

From a Special Historical Edition of the Walton Advertiser, from February, 1939.  There's no author credited.


The Walton Methodist Church came into existence in the year 1879.  It was organized under the ministry of Reverend W. W. Spates.  There were eight charter members, namely,: Mr. W. Ran Rouse, Mr. And Mrs. A. M. Rouse, Mr. And Mrs. Cyrus Coffman and Mr. And Mrs. Frank Harmon, and one other member of the Harmon family.
Services were originally held in the public school building for a few months, or the year 1879 in the Baptist Church, and finally in the Christian Church until the congregation created its own house of worship, known as "Walls Chapel," in the year of 1886 under the ministry of Rev. B. F. Bristow.  The lot on which this building was erected is situated just north of the present [i.e. old] high school building in Walton, and was donated to the congregation by Mr. John Wall Murphy and by his wife, Mrs. Anna E. Murphy of Marion County, Ind.  The purpose of this donation was that a suitable memorial might be erected to the memory of Rev. and Mrs. John Walls of Cincinnati, Ohio, both of whom, however, were then deceased and buried in the Wesleyan Cemetery at Cumminsville; hence the name "Walls Chapel was given to this first house of worship.  The deed to this lot was executed on January 28th, 1884.  A. M. Rouse, W. R. Rouse, and Frank Harmon were then the Trustees of the church.

The building was dedicated on June 6, 1886 by Rev. W. F. Taylor, then pastor of Scott Street Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in Covington, Ky.  This same minister also assisted the pastor, Rev. B. F. Bristow, in a revival meeting conducted in the new house of worship.  Forty to fifty new members were added to the congregation at that time.

The pastors before the erection of the first house of worship were W. W. Spates; organizer in 1879, E. F. Gosling, Chum Overstreet, H. C. Wright, and Stamper Walker.

The present house of worship, located on South Main Street, was built under the ministry of Rev. John H. Lewis in 1922-30.  It is a beautiful, modern, and adequate brick structure with ample facilities for worship, Church School work, recreation, and for the work of the various organizations of the church.  It is a credit to the community.  The members of the building committee were Rev. J. H. Lewis, Horace Simpson, Mrs. Hattie Metcalfe, Mrs. Pearl Johnson, and C. T. Hall.

An art bronze name plate has recently been placed over the entrance doors to the Sanctuary with the inscription "Walls Chapel 1886-1930" to preserve the original memorial to the Reverend John Walls and wife and the number of years (44) of the use of the "Walls Chapel" by the congregation.  With this larger and finer, and more durable edifice, the present memorial is adjudged to be or more value than the original one.

While this house of worship has been in use by the church since 1930, it was not cleared of indebtedness until 1937 during the ministry of the present pastor, R. R. Rose.  In 1936-37 the wall of the building were [sic] treated against moisture seepage from without.  The interior was beautifully decorated, the acoustics of the sanctuary were corrected by the installation of a carpet, a coal bin was built, a Hammond Electric-organ purchased as well as 104 new Methodist Hymnals, and other things were done.  In the meantime the remaining indebtedness of $2,200.00 on the original construction of the church plant was raised completely and it was dedicated on August 8, 1937 by R./ R. Rose, assisted by J. H. Lewis, D. E. Bedinger, John E. Roberts.

The total cost of this property was approximately $26,500 besides the organ, which cost $1,335.00, making a total cost of $27,835.00.  In addition to this splendid house of worship the congregation also owns an adequate parsonage located on North Main Street and recently equipped with modern conveniences.  IT is valued at $4,000.00; legal steps were taken recently to clear the title to the original church building lot on which "Walls Chapel" was situated.  This lot is valued at $1,000.  The total property value of the Walton Methodist Church is, therefore, approximately $32,835.00.

The membership of the congregation has increased from eight charter members to 118 at the present time.

Pastors who have served the church after the time "Walls Chapel" was built and dedicated are: J. N. Current, E. G. B. Mann, Oscar Duvall (died while here - a brother-in-law by the name of Prior filled the unexpired term), Cooper, P. H. Hoffman, W. F. Rowland, J. W. Cates, E. E. Holmes, H. R. Mills, F. S. Pollitt, Edward Allen, O. M. Humphrey, J. B. Harris, Will B. Campbell, H. C. Martin, R. B. Baird, C. J. Nugent, D. E. Bedinger, W. B. Garriott, G. W. Hoggman, H. W. Whitaker, Wade H. Caldwell, C. H. Rule, T. J. Roberts, John H. Lewis, G. B. Trayner, E. L. Ockerman, and R. R. Rose, now serving his fourth year.

The present officials of the church are: Trustees: T. C. Hall, B. H. Franks, Horace Simpson, Bruce Wallace, C. O. Carlisle, Mr. and Mrs. Gover Young (Mrs. Young is church treasurer), G. K. Gregory, and Miss Lovenna Edwards, a former treasurer of the church.  Emma Jane Miller is President of the Board of Christian Education., Clifford Pruett is superintendent of the Church School, Mrs. W. O. Rouse is President of the Ladies Aid Society.  Mrs. Lulu Hudson is chairman of the Missionary Committee in the Church.  Mrs. F. E. Bedinger is leader of the the choir and Mrs. Bruce Wallace is President of Young Comers Missionary Society and Mrs. J. B. Johnson is organist.  Two retired ministers of the Kentucky Annual Conference also live in Walton and are members of the Quarterly Conference, namely, D. E. Bedinger and John E. Roberts superannuate.

At the present time the official name of this church is "Methodist Episcopal Church, South," in Walton, Ky., of course.  Next spring, however, this will be changed to simply "The Methodist Church," since three Methodist denominations of the country have already officially voted to unite and the merger will be completed at Kansas City, Mo., in a General Conference which goes in session there on April 28, 1939.  The three denominations which are uniting are the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Methodist Protestant Church.  When this merger is completed it will be the largest Protestant body of Christian people in the United States, with a membership of 8,000,000 and with a constituency much larger.